Posts Written On December 29, 2019

Sitka Salmon Shares bring wild Alaskan seafood straight from their fishermen’s collective to your doorstep

Are you looking for some recipes for your New Year Feast? How about making a nutritious and healthy dinner with wild Alaskan king salmon? I believe every guest on your list will be happy and thankful for a great dinner.

Sitka Salmon’s fish are wild-caught in Alaska and the North Pacific, by a group of equally wild (though extremely nice) fishermen. You won’t find any antibiotics or dyes here. Just pristine fish from one of the most pristine places in the entire world! Most of the world’s fish are caught by large factory boats that fish waters distant from their home ports. When you buy from their CSF, you are helping to put your dollars directly into the pockets of fishing families and their small-boat fishermen that depend on fishing as a livelihood.

Sitka Salmon’s fishermen follow some of the most careful quality handling standards in the industry, ensuring that the best fish is delivered to your doorstep. This includes shorter trips, bleeding, icing, and carefully handling to avoid bruising. Back on shore, the fish are flash­-frozen at the peak of their freshness at Sitka Salmon’s small processing plant in Sitka or at one of their trusted partner plants. This is why writers at Bon Appetit say Sitka Salmon is a “Best Way to Buy Sustainable Seafood” and ​Food & Wine magazine notes, “If you love salmon, you need to know about @SitkaShares.” (That’s them, in the Twitterverse.)

By efficiently bringing Sitka Salmon’s fish directly to you, Salmon Shares fishermen generally retain 10 to 30 percent more of the value of their harvest. Plus, many of them are owners of the company! With Sitka Salmon, you’re getting fish directly from sustainably minded, small­-scale family fishermen who are a driving force in the company.

Sitka Salmon’s relationships and selective sourcing ensure that your fish is traceable to the boats of their fishermen-owners or trusted community partners. The source of your fish is provided with each month’s seafood delivery, and members get to know their fishermen through newsletters delivered with their shares, blogs, videos and more. Sitka Salmon offset carbon emissions in our Alaska-to-Midwest distribution system, and they donate 1 percent of their revenue back to wild fish conservation. Right now, our 1 percent to the Wild fund is supporting a Wild Salmon Conservation and Restoration Internship at Knox College and helping a young filmmaker launch a film on small­-scale fishing called The Last Man Fishing.

You reserve your share of the harvest, Sitka Salmon’s fishermen catch your fish, and Sitka Salmon do home­-deliver. Sitka Salmon also send you recipes, host member events, and share cooking tips. Eating healthy, wild-caught fish couldn’t be more simple!

Alaska’s State Constitution mandates the sustainable management of fisheries. To accomplish this, scientists diligently study fish stocks, managers set strict catch limits to ensure the viability of wild fish populations, and fishermen abide by these limits. It’s why Alaska’s fisheries are the envy of the world.

Eugene’s Dill Smoked Salmon

Prep: 5 min  |  Total: 1.5 hours
Serves: 2

Ingredients

  • 12 oz wild Alaskan coho salmon
  • 1 oz dill weed
  • 1 alder wood plank
  • 3 oz spicy sesame seed oil
  • Salt to taste

Directions:

SEASON SALMON

Place the salmon in a large bowl and top it will all of the oil, dill and some of the salt. Let it sit for 20-35 min.

PREP THE GRILL

Fire up a grill or smoker and char the wood plank on both sides. If not using a smoker, place some soaked wood chips in a vented aluminum foil pouch on the hot coals. Set up the grill or smoker for low heat – 180° F for the smoker, or indirect heat with a small amount of coals on a grill.

SMOKE

Place the salmon on the plank then on to the grill or smoker. Smoke for 90 mins at 180° F in the smoker, or between 20-35 mins on the grill.

Eugene’s Tip: This smoked salmon is perfect to top salads with or to make into salmon burgers.

Quick-Cured Coho Salmon Appetizer Bites

Prep: 10 mins  |  Total: 40 mins

Ingredients

  • ½ lb coho fillet, skin removed and cut into ½ inch cubes
  • 3 tbsp salt
  • 2 tbsp sugar
  • ½ cup sour cream
  • ¼ cup mayonnaise
  • 1 small shallot, minced
  • juice of ½ lemon
  • 2 tbsp capers, chopped
  • 2 tsp horseradish
  • 1 tbsp chives, minced
  • 1 tsp dill, chopped
  • salt & pepper to taste
  • crackers for serving

Directions:

Toss coho cubes with the salt and sugar. Cure the salmon cubes in the refrigerator for 20-30 minutes, then rinse and pat dry.

Combine sour cream, mayonnaise, shallot, lemon juice, capers, horseradish, chives and dill. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

Spoon some sauce on crackers and place 2-3 pieces of salmon on top, or lay out a spread of salmon bites, sauce, and crackers for guests to build their own. Garnish with chopped parsley or chives.

Dara’s pro cooking tip: Have these appetizer bites ready when friends and family arrive, and serve with glasses of brut prosecco.

Joe’s Herb Grilled Lingcod

Prep: 24 hours  |  Total: 24 hours
Serves: 4

Ingredients

  • 1 pound lingcod, cut in 3-4 pieces
  • 2 tablespoons chopped fresh thyme
  • 2 tablespoons chopped fresh chives
  • ¼ cup olive oil
  • 1 squeeze fresh lemon juice
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • Cracked black pepper to taste
  • Optional: 1 container of sundried tomato pesto (We like Trader Joe’s)

Directions:

MARINATE

Combine fish, chives, thyme, olive oil, lemon juice, salt and black pepper in a 1-gallon ziplock bag. Marinate in fridge overnight.

GRILL

Heat gas or charcoal grill to medium-high heat. Oil grill grates well to prevent sticking. Grill for 3 min. a side for thinner pieces or 7-8 min. a side for thicker pieces.

SERVE

On the boat, Joe serves this with rice. We also love it with roasted potatoes and salad.

Joe’s pro cooking tip: Start grilling the thicker pieces of lingcod first. You’ll know the fish is done when it flakes with the gentle press of a finger.

0 Comments